Intellectual property rights for indigenous peoples a sourcebook

Cover of: Intellectual property rights for indigenous peoples |

Published by Society for Applied Anthropology in Oklahoma, OK .

Written in

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Subjects:

  • Intellectual property,
  • Indigenous peoples,
  • Developing countries,
  • Western Hemisphere

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Book details

StatementTom Greaves, editor.
ContributionsGreaves, Tom.
The Physical Object
Paginationxiv, 274 ;
Number of Pages274
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23375337M

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Intellectual Property Rights for Indigenous Peoples: A Source Book [Greaves, Tom] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Intellectual Property Rights for Indigenous Peoples: A Source Book5/5(1). Intellectual Property Rights for Indigenous Peoples: A Source Book by A copy that has been read, but remains in clean condition.

All pages are intact, and the cover is intact. The spine may show signs of wear. Pages can include limited notes and highlighting, and the copy can include previous owner inscriptions.

Intellectual Property Rights versus Indigenous Peoples Rights and Obligations. Acknowledging the spiritual dimension of their universe and respecting the mauri or central life force of every living thing was fundamentally important to the Maori world view.

This sourcebook presents a collection of papers focusing on the intellectual property rights (IPR) of indigenous peoples--their rights to protect and control their cultural knowledge. Subsidiary IPR goals are to manage the degree and process by which cultural knowledge is shared with outsiders and, in some instances, to be justly compensated for by: Beyond Intellectual Property: Toward Traditional Resource Rights for Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities by Darrell A.

Posey, Graham Dutfield and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at Dr. Picart's book offers a unique and compelling analysis of indigenous peoples' rights in the context of intellectual property. This topic is gaining prominence in the scholarly literature in multiple contexts and is part of a growing call for legal recognition of and respect for indigenous culture and traditional : Caroline Joan S.

Picart. In Beyond Intellectual Property, authors Darrell A. Posey and Graham Dutfield listen and respond to this voice. They offer sound and reasonable advice on how indigenous peoples and local communities worldwide should approach and deal with the myriad of issues surrounding intellectual property and traditional resource rights.

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xiv, ; 23 cm: Contents: IPR, a current survey / Tom Greaves --Gifts from the Creator: intellectual property rights and folk crop varieties / Daniela Soleri [and others] --Tribal sovereignty and the control of knowledge / Sandra Lee Pinel and Michael J.

Evans --Collecting traditional medicines in. This book outlines that regime, and how the symbolic function of international intellectual property continues today to assist states to enclose indigenous peoples' knowledge. Drawing on more than interviews, Peter Drahos examines the response of indigenous people to the colonizer's non-developmental property by: Indigenous Cultural and Intellectual Property refers to the rights that Indigenous people have, and want to have, to protect their traditional arts and culture.

ICIP is a short way of saying Australian “Indigenous Cultural and Intellectual Property”. Sometimes the words “Cultural Heritage” are used to mean the same thing. Book Indigenous Peoples and Climate Change in Latin America and United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Publication “Intellectual Property and Genetic.

After colonization, indigenous people faced an extractive property rights regime for both their land and knowledge. This book outlines that regime, and how the symbolic function of international intellectual property continues today to assist 4/5.

A full discussion of bioprospecting and Indigenous peoples is outside the scope of this paper, but see for example Josephine Axt, M.L.

Corn, M. Lee and D.M. Ackerman, Biotechnology, Indigenous peoples, and Intellectual property Rights, Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, Washington DC, ; Andrew Gray, Between the Spice of.

intellectual property according to Indigenous customary law ♦ maintain the secrecy of Indigenous knowledge and other cultural practices ♦ to be given full and proper attribution for sharing their heritage 1 Terri Janke, Our culture: our future: Report on Australian Indigenous cultural and intellectual property rights.

Indigenous Peoples and Intellectual Property. Lorie Graham * Stephen McJohn ** “There is a relationship, in the laws or philosophies of indigenous peoples, between cultural property and intellectual property, and [] the protection of both is essential to the indigenous peoples’ cultural and economic.

survival” 1. Michael F Cited by: 4. Intellectual Property Rights and Indigenous Peoples Annotated Bibliography Jessica Scott Jerome I. Legal Frameworks and Analysis Alexander, D. “Some themes in intellectual property and the environment.” Review of European Community and File Size: 73KB.

Introduction: Mapping Indigenous Intellectual Property Matthew Rimmer. PART I INTERNATIONAL LAW 1. The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: A Human Rights Framework for Intellectual Property Rights Mauro Barelli. The World Trade Organization, The TRIPS Agreement and Traditional Knowledge Tania Voon.

by: 2. Canada’s laws have ignored the cultural and intellectual property rights of Indigenous peoples, and even legalized the theft of their property.

intellectual property over such cultural heritage, traditional knowledge, and traditional cultural expressions. United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Arti What is the issue.

Indigenous/traditional knowledge and intellectual property law is a compli-cated contemporary legal problem. Greaves, T. (editor) Intellectual Property Rights for Indigenous Peoples: A Source Book.

Society for Applied Anthropology, Oklahoma City, OK; Janke, Terri Our Culture: Our Future. Report on Australian Indigenous Cultural and Intellectual Property Rights. Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission, and.

In book: Intellectual Property, Cultural Property and Intangible Cultural Heritage (pp) to be aligned with the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. any discussion about.

This book analyses the relationship between intellectual property and indigenous innovation. The contributors come from different disciplinary backgrounds including law, ethnobotany and science.

Drawing on examples from Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands, each of the contributors explores the possibilities and limits of intellectual.

Between State and capital: NGOs as allies of indigenous peoples A legal paradigm for protecting traditional knowledge Human rights and cultural heritage, developments in the United Nations Working Group on indigenous populations Human rights implications of indigenous peoples 's intellectual property rights Erica-Irene Daes, Protection of the Heritage of Indigenous People.

United Nations, Office for the High Commissioner for Human Rights, Tom Greaves, ed., Intellectual Property Rights for Indigenous Peoples: A Source Book. Taking an interdisciplinary approach unmatched by any other book on this topic, this thoughtful Handbook considers the international struggle to provide for proper and just protection of Indigenous intellectual property (IP).

In light Author: Matthew Rimmer. Introduction: Mapping Indigenous Intellectual Property Matthew Rimmer PART I INTERNATIONAL LAW 1.

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: A Human Rights Framework for Intellectual Property Rights Mauro Barelli 2.

The World Trade Organization, The TRIPS Agreement and Traditional Knowledge Tania Voon 3. The relationship between intellectual property (IP) and the protection of Indigenous knowledge and cultural expressions is complex and challenging. The following is intended to provide an overview to stimulate and inform broader policy discussions in Canada.

Introduction: Mapping Indigenous Intellectual Property Matthew Rimmer PART I INTERNATIONAL LAW 1. The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: A Human Rights Framework for Intellectual Property Rights Mauro Barelli 2.

The World Trade Organization, The TRIPS Agreement and Traditional Knowledge Tania Voon : Matthew Rimmer. “Indigenous peoples and intellectual property.” (Contemporary and Comparative Perspectives on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples) Washington University Journal of Law & Policy () – [ Read it online ].

Intellectual property law, concerned with offering all kinds of different and varied protections never considered Indigenous knowledge valuable. It actively supported the contexts and nonindigenous individuals that appropriated, stole, and/or made this knowledge into colonial and recognizable forms of (intellectual) property.

This is according to a book by this author titled ‘The Intellectual and Cultural Property Rights of Indigenous and Tribal Peoples in Asia’ written for the Minority Rights Group International.

The concept of traditional resource rights (TRR) reflects the necessity of rethinking the limited and limiting concept of intellectual property rights (IPR). The TRR concept can accommodate a wide range of relevant international agreements as a basis for a sui-generis system of protection for indigenous peoples and their intellectual, natural, and technological resources.

Get this from a library. Indigenous heritage and self-determination: the cultural and intellectual property rights of indigenous peoples. [Tony Simpson; Forest Peoples Programme.; International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs.]. Intersections between Indigenous Human Rights and Intellectual Property Issues 8.

C on clusi on Th e Unavoidable Intersection of Human Rights anntellecdI tualopePr yt r Assessing Existing Proposals to Reconcile Human Rights and Intellectual Property Toward a Human Rights Framework for Intellectual Proper t y Cited by:   In Intellectual Property Rights for Indigenous Peoples: a Source Book,(Tom Greaves, ed.

55 " Darrell A. Posey, Safeguarding Traditional Resource Rights of Indigenous by: 4. Indigenous Intellectual Property. Part of the publisher's series of research handbooks on IP, this book, "considers the international struggle to provide for proper and just protection of Indigenous intellectual property (IP)" and 5/5.

These rights include the right of these peoples to participate in the use, management and conser-vation of these resources. Draft Declaration on Indigenous Rights Article Indigenous peoples are entitled to the recognition of the full ownership, control and protection of their cultural and intellectual property.

Between state and capital: NGOs as allies of indigenous peoples / Jack Kloppenburg, Jr. and Tirso Gonzales -- A legal paradigm for protecting traditional knowledge / David J. Stephenson, Jr.

-- Human rights and cultural heritage, developments in the United Nations Working Group on Indigenous Populations / Dean B.

Suagee -- Human rights Pages: Intellectual property enables individuals to gain financially from sharing unique and useful knowledge. Compensating indigenous people for sharing their knowledge and resources might both validate and be an equitable reward for indigenous knowledge of biological resources, and might promote the conservation of those resources.

This book contains 15 chapters that Cited by: Valuing Local Knowledge book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers.

Indigenous People And Intellectual Property Rights” as Want to Read: Currently the focus of a heated debate among indigenous peoples, human rights advocates, crop breeders, pharmaceutical companies, conservationists, /5(2).

INDIGENOUS CULTURAL & INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY (ICIP) ICIP is a short way of saying Australian “Indigenous Cultural and Intellectual Property”. Sometimes the words “Cultural Heritage” are used to mean the same thing.

1. What is ICIP? ICIP refers to all the rights that Indigenous people have, and want to have, to protect their traditionalFile Size: KB.the W orld Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO).

e intellectual property rights (IPRs) regime and the worldview, in which it is based on, stand in stark contrast to indigenous world views Author: Michael Ogwezzy.Overall, Mathew Rimmer’s Handbook of Contemporary Research on Indigenous Intellectual Property Issues provides a comprehensive overview of the complex legal and policy landscape that indigenous peoples, governments and inter-governmental processes are all trying to use, amend and negotiate in order to design more effective long-term cultural.

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